Steps to cloud-based unified communications

Moving your business’s resources to the cloud is quickly becoming the mainstream formula for success. But this comes with certain risks and requires careful planning. Your organization’s unified communications system (UC) is no exception and can be more challenging than moving other functions. To better ensure a trouble-free experience, take note of these steps. Opt […]

5 VoIP services you need to know about

More individual users and business owners are becoming aware of Voice over Internet Protocol’s (VoIP) features and advantages over conventional landlines. As technology progresses, the options available for VoIP also increases. Find out which service is best for your needs in the compilation below. VoIP comes in a variety of forms. Do you rarely leave […]

How to minimize VoIP downtime

Disasters can happen at any time, and if your company is unprepared, it can put you out of business. One of the most essential technologies today is Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) telephony systems. Should a disaster knock your VoIP offline, you will lose people, productivity, and ultimately, profit. Avoid such a fate by following […]

Business phones: How long should they last?

Good communication remains critical to the success of a business. A company should have an efficient and effective business phone system for internal and external communication. And given the rapid developments in technology, it’s important to invest in a phone system that lasts. Different phone systems Phones have come a long way, from analog landlines […]

How many types of VoIP services are there?

Should your business deploy a cloud-based or on-premises VoIP system? What’s the difference between software-based VoIP and its mobile counterpart? Which type of VoIP services will suit you most? Featured below is a compilation of all VoIP options and their details to help you answer those questions. VoIP comes in a variety of forms. Do […]

Microsoft Teams: The new Skype for Business?

Microsoft unveiled plenty of new developments and upgrades during last month’s Ignite conference, but one that shocked many users is what’s happening to Skype for Business. The tech giant confirmed that they are phasing out Skype for Business and going all in on their new collaboration platform, Microsoft Teams. Upgrades for Teams To phase out […]

Tips for a cloud-based unified communications

The number of small businesses that will move their unified communications to the cloud is predicted to increase from 10% to 48%, while medium-sized firms and large enterprises follow, albeit in smaller percentages. These numbers are not surprising because migrating unified communications to the cloud presents a host of benefits to communication systems: simplicity, flexibility, […]

Backing Up Your Data in the Cloud? Here are Some Things You Should Know

So your data is stored in the cloud. That’s a good thing, right? Absolutely – if you’ve done your due diligence and fully understand the service of your provider. Asking the right questions and taking a few precautions will go a long way in ensuring that you can recover your critical data quickly should data loss occur. A few weeks ago, Amazon suffered several days of outage in its EC2 and RDS service, bringing down dozens if not hundreds of services along with it — including such high-profile sites as Reddit, Heroku, Foursquare, Quora, and many others. Although the cause of that outage has been analyzed extensively in many forums, the discussion is interesting and relevant because it brings attention to the lesson that wherever or whomever you entrust your data to—be it in the “cloud” or to a big company like Amazon — it pays to be smart about how you manage your data, especially if it’s critical to your business. Understand your options. When someone else is managing your data, it’s easy to leave the details to them. However, making sure that you at least have some understanding of what your options are in what different service providers can offer you will pay dividends later if something goes wrong, since you’ll be better equipped to make an informed decision on the spot. Things you should look at include: Who is the service provider? What is their history? Who is behind them? What is their track record? Where do they store your data? Do they own the servers where your data is stored or do they rely on someone else? Is your data stored within the local area (i.e., a drive away) or is it distributed all over the map? Do they provide a mirror of your data within your own server, or is everything in their data centers? What measures do they employ to make sure your data is safe? What methods do they employ to ensure you can get to your data when you need it? Do they provide service level assurances or guarantees to back up their claims? These are just some of the basic questions you should be asking of your service provider. Do a test drive. Often you will not know exactly how a service works until the rubber hits the road, so to speak. Ask your service provider for a demo or a trial period. Test how fast it is to back up your data, but more importantly how fast you can bring it back when you need it. This is especially important if you’re talking about gigabytes of data. Understand that doing backups in the cloud can be hampered by your bandwidth and many other components of your system and theirs. Don’t put all your eggs in one basket. Some service providers give users the option of storing data in multiple sites, to ensure that your data is safe if one site goes down. But why rely on just one service provider when you can get the services of multiple providers instead? Or perhaps better yet, why not manage some of your data on your own? While it may be complex and costly to reproduce what many service providers can provide today, it is relatively easy to set up a simple system to keep at least some of your really, really important data locally by using an unused computer or a relatively cheap, network-attached storage device or secondary/removable drive that you can buy at your local store. Create a plan and write it down . Unforeseen occurrences can and will happen — not only from your side but from your service provider’s as well. When they do happen, you will need to have a contingency plan ready, often referred to as a Business Continuity Plan. Make sure to document your plan in writing, and communicate it to everyone in your organization so they will know what to do in case disaster strikes. With its promise of unprecedented efficiency, reliability, scalability, and cost savings, cloud computing and storing your data in the cloud is the topic du jour these days. However, it’s sometimes easy to overlook the basic due diligence that’s necessary regardless of how or where your data is stored. Ultimately, it is your business on the line—and being prudent and proactive about how your data is stored, managed, and (most importantly) recovered in times of need will save you much grief when you actually need it.